We Are "HEAR" For You!

What's New At Naro Audiology

The "hearing" landscape is changing rapidly. Greater numbers of Americans are experiencing hearing loss at younger ages while the United States is undergoing an upward demographic shift in age. Meanwhile people eager to stay actively engaged in full, rewarding, and productive lives are putting off retirement and staying in the workforce longer.

These emerging societal trends are creating an environment in which youthful-minded Baby Boomers and Gen Xers are coming to realize the importance of good hearing to their professional and personal lives, not to mention to their quality of life and overall health. The good news is that hearing assistance technologies are catching up with the needs and wants of this dynamic generation of change-makers.

Also. November is National Alzheimer's Disease Awareness Month. Research now shows older adults with hearing loss may have a higher risk of developing dementia, including Alzheimer's Disease. Why wait to take that step to explore a personal hearing solution or upgrade to the latest digital technology? We, at Nero Audiology & Hearing Solutions are "hear for you"!

Understanding Your Hearing

Courtesy of the Better Hearing Institute

The ability to hear is a gift. It's something to value and protect. After all, anyone can lose their hearing at any time in life. While many things outside our control can cause hearing loss, one thing over which we do have some control is noise.

Noise causes hearing loss. Yet, every day you can protect your hearing by keeping down the volume—on smartphones, MP3 players, stereos, televisions, and other audio devices. Also, take care to limit the duration and volume when using earhticis and headphones. When you do know you'll be around loud noise, wear ear protection. And get into the habit of using your fingers to quickly plug your ears when an unexpected loud sound, like a siren, suddenly bombards you.

Noise threatens our hearing because we hear sound when delicate hair cells in our inner ears vibrate. This creates nerve signals that the brain understands as sound. If we overload these delicate hair cells with exposure to loud noises, we damage them.

This results in sensorineural hearing loss and often tinnitus—or "ringing in the ears. "The hair cells that vibrate most quickly—and that allow us to hear higher-frequency sounds like birds singing and children speaking—usually become damaged, dying first.”

In addition to excessive noise—from construction, rock music, or gunfire, for example—the main causes of hearing loss are:

  • Aging (presbyctisisl)
  • chemotherapy, radiation)
  • Sudden onset
  • Infections (otitis media)
  • Injury to the head or ear
  • Birth defects or genetics (e.g., otosclerosis)
  • Ototoxic reaction to drugs or cancer treatment (e.g., antibiotics,